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Classroom Resources

My Chicago

Posted under Classroom Resources for Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Designed for children ages 6 to 12, My Chicago uses the symbols and design of the city’s flag to explore our rich and diverse history. The curriculum illustrates Chicago’s past and present by drawing on the Museum’s collections, including a variety of photographs, documents, and images of artifacts. The activities are appropriate for use in the classroom More

Playing in Chicago

Posted under History Lab for Grades 3, 4, 5

From bicycles to electric trains to paper dolls, Chicagoland was once home to an enormous toy industry. Chicago companies brought new kinds of toys to the market, including transportation toys, like Tootsie Toys, and construction toys, such as Tinker Toys and Lincoln Logs. This unit will introduce students to the inventors of these toys, explore More

Sew What! Samplers as part of American History

Posted under History Lab for Grades 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Samplers can teach us about the domestic arts, societal beliefs, and women’s education. In this unit, students will analyze samplers and other primary sources (school records, advertisements, and photographs) to understand the connection women have had over time to the domestic arts, especially sewing. Students will discover the process and purpose of creating samplers and how More

Slavery and Freedom in America

Posted under History Lab for Grades 5, 6, 7, 8

This unit examines the broad meanings of slavery and freedom in America through the life of a woman named Hannah Harris. Hannah was a weaver on Robert Carter’s plantation in Virginia. In anticipation of her freedom, she sent Carter a note asking to purchase her loom. The lessons in this unit include detailed analysis of More

The Civil War: Up Close and Personal

Posted under History Lab for Grades 3, 4, 5

Confederate Private William D. Huff began a diary after he was captured during the Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 18 and 19, 1863. In his diary, Huff narrates his experiences at Camp Douglas, Chicago’s confederate prison camp. He includes descriptions of escape attempts, harsh punishments, and disease. The diary ends with Huff’s parole and return More

Chicago History Museum Sharing Chicago's Stories
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