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Museum closure due to COVID-19 more

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Keeping Chicago Safe

Every Sunday, we’re featuring a story submitted to our community-based initiative, In This Together, which collects digital records that capture personal experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. “In response to the need for PPE during the COVID-19 crisis, Tanya Polsky and other moms of students at Latin School started an effort to produce and donate masks More

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“Chicago’s Finest Eating House”

For Food Friday, let’s revisit an old Chicago favorite—Fritzel’s. Before air travel was common, Chicago was a popular stopping point for celebrities traveling by train between New York and Los Angeles, and there were certain restaurants where a star sighting was more or less guaranteed. Located at State and Lake Streets in the Loop, Fritzel’s More

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Baseball Palace of the World

On this day in 1910, Comiskey Park opened. Designed by Zachary Taylor Davis, the fireproof steel and concrete stadium was located on the South Side at 35th Street and Shields Avenue and built on a former city landfill. The stadium was originally named White Sox Park but was renamed a few years later after White More

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Re: American Freedoms

The Declaration of Independence is one of the founding documents that shaped American society, professing the equality of all men and their access to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. However, these unalienable rights outlined in the document and the presumption of equality were not extended to all. This Fourth of July, join us More

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Re: American Freedoms

The Declaration of Independence is one of the founding documents that shaped American society, professing equality and access to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. However, these unalienable rights outlined in the document and the presumption of equality have not extended to all. Join the Chicago History Museum and Chicago civic leaders for their More

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A Revolutionary by Any Other Name

The architect of the Black Power movement who coined the term “Black power,” Stokely Carmichael was born on this day in 1941. He was a leading voice during the Civil Rights Movement, first as a field secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, pronounced “snick”) and later in the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party. Born More

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