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Classroom Resources

Facing Freedom in America

Posted under Classroom Resources for Grades 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

In the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, the Founding Fathers set out to define American freedom. But they didn’t have the last word. Since then, generations have built on and challenged this foundation. Experience four ways Americans have defined freedom for themselves: defending it through armed conflict, struggling with it in respect to race and More

Fighting for Freedom: African Americans in the Civil War

Posted under History Lab for Grades 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

This unit explores the African American’s experiences during the Civil War. Students will learn how government policy evolved over time regarding African American service in the Union forces and examine issues of propaganda and unequal treatment. The unit utilizes a variety of primary source materials, including illustrations, photographs, and documents. Students will complete a variety More

History Lab Introduction

Posted under History Lab for Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Inspired by the Museum’s collection, local classroom teachers wrote and tested History Lab lesson plans. They are grouped into twelve topics. Lessons from each unit may be used independently or as a set. Each lesson includes a lesson plan, student materials, and reproductions of artifacts and/or photographs from the Museum’s collection. These materials may be downloaded, More

History Through Opposing Eyes: America and Protest

Posted under History Lab for Grades 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Great changes and events in history have often started with protest. From town hall meetings and rallies to demonstrations and war, protest has instigated change in our society. The lessons in this unit will help students compare and contrast the different methods of protest and understand protest as a part of American history. Students will More

Lincoln’s Undying Words

Posted under Classroom Resources for Grades 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Explore Abraham Lincoln’s changing views toward slavery and racial equality through five of his key speeches: A House Divided (1858); his first and second inaugural addresses (1861, 1865); the Gettysburg Address (1863); and the speech on Reconstruction (1865). Use the two PDFs to help your students interpret and investigate the legacy of Lincoln’s presidency as More

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