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Classroom Resources

History Lab Introduction

Posted under History Lab for Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Inspired by the Museum’s collection, local classroom teachers wrote and tested History Lab lesson plans. They are grouped into twelve topics. Lessons from each unit may be used independently or as a set. Each lesson includes a lesson plan, student materials, and reproductions of artifacts and/or photographs from the Museum’s collection. These materials may be downloaded, More

History Through Opposing Eyes: America and Protest

Posted under History Lab for Grades 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Great changes and events in history have often started with protest. From town hall meetings and rallies to demonstrations and war, protest has instigated change in our society. The lessons in this unit will help students compare and contrast the different methods of protest and understand protest as a part of American history. Students will More

Remembering Dr. King

Posted under Classroom Resources for Grades 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

The Remembering Dr. King: 1929–1968 exhibition invites students and teachers to walk through a winding gallery featuring of twenty-five photographs depicting key moments in Dr. King’s work and the civil rights movement, with a special focus on his time in Chicago. This classroom resource allows you to bring a portion of the experience into your More

Sew What! Samplers as part of American History

Posted under History Lab for Grades 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Samplers can teach us about the domestic arts, societal beliefs, and women’s education. In this unit, students will analyze samplers and other primary sources (school records, advertisements, and photographs) to understand the connection women have had over time to the domestic arts, especially sewing. Students will discover the process and purpose of creating samplers and how More

Slavery and Freedom in America

Posted under History Lab for Grades 5, 6, 7, 8

This unit examines the broad meanings of slavery and freedom in America through the life of a woman named Hannah Harris. Hannah was a weaver on Robert Carter’s plantation in Virginia. In anticipation of her freedom, she sent Carter a note asking to purchase her loom. The lessons in this unit include detailed analysis of More

Chicago History Museum Sharing Chicago's Stories
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