Notice

The Modern by Design exhibition will be temporarily closed for repairs. More

Classroom Resources

America’s Documents of Freedom

Posted under History Lab for Grades 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the Emancipation Proclamation are often referred to collectively as the Documents of Freedom. As a group, these documents demonstrate the evolution of American democracy and freedoms. The lessons in this unit examine how changes in government impact individuals differently; how freedom is interpreted through More

Face-to-Face with the Great Depression

Posted under History Lab for Grades 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

During the Great Depression approximately 25 percent of working Americans lost their jobs, but how did this really affect the people who lived through those years, and how do our times relate to their experiences? In this unit, students will study the causes and effects of the Depression through the reflections of those who lived More

Great Chicago Stories

Posted under Great Chicago Stories for Grades 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 12

                            Enrich your instruction with Great Chicago Stories, an award-winning suite of twelve historical fiction narratives and supporting classroom resources. Download the narratives, which were written and classroom-tested by local teachers, and corresponding artifact sets. Use the map interactive to see where More

History Lab Introduction

Posted under History Lab for Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Inspired by the Museum’s collection, local classroom teachers wrote and tested History Lab lesson plans. They are grouped into twelve topics. Lessons from each unit may be used independently or as a set. Each lesson includes a lesson plan, student materials, and reproductions of artifacts and/or photographs from the Museum’s collection. These materials may be downloaded, More

Lincoln’s Undying Words

Posted under Classroom Resources for Grades 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Explore Abraham Lincoln’s changing views toward slavery and racial equality through five of his key speeches: A House Divided (1858); his first and second inaugural addresses (1861, 1865); the Gettysburg Address (1863); and the speech on Reconstruction (1865). Use the two PDFs to help your students interpret and investigate the legacy of Lincoln’s presidency as More

Chicago History Museum Sharing Chicago's Stories
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