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Dance: A Universal Language

Dance is a form of cultural expression that builds community ties. To celebrate International Dance Day, we’re highlighting the story of Mirzet Dzubur, whom we interviewed for our exhibition American Medina: Stories of Muslim Chicago. Dzubur is a Bosniak refugee from Prijedor, Bosnia, who fled his country’s genocide of Muslims in 1995 with his wife and two sons. Within one month of settling here, he founded KUD “Bosna” Chicago, a folk dance troupe for Bosniak youth. The dancers perform traditional folk dances at weddings, social and religious ceremonies, and other cultural events in the Chicago area and around the United States and Canada. 

Hear more wide-ranging stories from Muslim people living in Chicago featured in the exhibition. Listen now.

Mirzet Dzubur (right) with KUD “Bosna” Chicago at the Chicago History Museum, 2019. Photograph by CHM staff

Stories of Muslim Chicago

Our exhibition American Medina: Stories of Muslim Chicago draws from more than 100 interviews conducted with Muslim Chicagoans sharing their stories of faith, identity, and personal journeys. Dozens of objects from local individuals and organizations, such as garments, artwork, and photographs, as well as videos and interactive experiences expand on how and why Chicago is known as the American Medina. Learn more.

KUD “Bosna” Chicago performing at the Chicago History Museum, November 2019.
KUD “Bosna” Chicago performing at the Chicago History Museum, November 2019.
Dzubur dressing a mannequin for display in American Medina, September 2019.
A folk dance costume in American Medina, October 2019.
Chicago History Museum Sharing Chicago's Stories
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